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Monday, January 17, 2011

Touching an RV with a bad electric ground connection could kill you.

This might be one of THE most important videos you watch if you are an RVer. It's short, so it won't take much of your valuable time. But watching it could save your life. See what can happen to you when you touch the body of an RV that's not grounded properly. It's a potentially lethal situation. Learn more about RV electric safety at NoShockZone.org.

11 comments:

  1. This is incredibly important information. Please tell all your RVer friends to watch. This is a topic rarely discussed, but very important. -- Chuck Woodbury, editor, RVtravel.com

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  2. I thought the problem was more than an open ground. I thought it was when the RV park miswired the connections and switched the ground and one of the hot wires. In fact there is a product that will check for miswired sockets.

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  3. It is about time that this issue gets the attention it deserves! I first wrote to RV Travel about this problem three (3) years ago. I had problems in several parks - one where I was told that no one else had the problems - it was just me. One park where I was measuring voltages ranging all the way from 80v to 150v, called in the local power company. Theyfound that transformer lug bolts 1/2 mile away were loose - that's enough to create the problems I saw.

    I have a surge protector installed now that will inform me that the connection is acceptable. But then, after you get knocked off a ladder in the rain by the voltage running through the skin of your RV, $300 is a small price for safety.

    By the way, when you discover bad electrical connections, expect the park owner/operator to nod their head and do ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about it. Trust me - it is NOT your motorhome - it is the park system!!

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  4. That is why I paid the "big bucks" for a portable surge guard.. It checks the pole for miss wiring, high voltage or low voltage and does not let the power through if it finds any faults.. and cuts off the nano second it detects a fault..
    here is a link to one... and NO I do not have any financial interest in the link...
    http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/product/portable-surge-guard/2279
    Seann Fox

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  5. For what was shown, it was good, but when it ended I was wondering what to do about it, how to prevent it. To me it brought up questions that it didn't answer.

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  6. Hot skin is the reason I won't plug into a power pedastel until I have checked the plug for a proper connection. Getting "nailed" once was more than enough.

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  7. I've had two campground shocking experiences and one at the old house my daughter and son-in-law bought in Red Springs, NC. I fixed the wiring problem in NC and notified the campground owners of the problems they had.

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  8. At a park last summer my surge protectors showed "red" and that I was not grounded. Called the office, they sent out their "electrician" he checks the box and says "the problem is with your coach." To be safe, I unplugged from the outlet and ran off my inverter. We have never had a problem like that at any other park. This is so wrong.

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  9. We're RV camping in my friend's driveway in Houston, TX. My wife and I received slight shocks when touching our RV door. Concerned, I remembered seeing the notice about watching the electrical shock video posted on Newsletter 465. I viewed it and immediately went to Sears where I bought a no-contact voltage detector. Returning and checking the outer skin of my RV, I saw that everywhere I put the detector, the warning light flashing on and the audio beeped! How frightening! I checked my friend's "homemade" extension cord, changed it, retested the RV and now all's well. Wow! I am so glad that video was posted, and my story turned out okay. Accept my thanks. -- Traveling from PEI through Texas

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  10. Mike, I've read all of your articles about electricity and learned a lot. Thank you for putting together this video. I'm sure it will save someone's life.

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  11. I'm the guy on this video (Mke Sokol, not Flash) and want to remind everyone who wants to know more about this subject that I've written a detailed series of RV electrical safety articles at http://www.noshockzone.org/category/rv-safety/ and http://rvtravel.com/noshockzone/index.shtml that show you how to do things like meter a pedestal outlet, test an extension cord, understand voltage and amperage, plus learn a bunch of other important stuff. Glad I could be of help with these articles and videos.

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